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Four Ways to Double the Power of Your Tax Refund
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What are bond ratings?
What bond ratings do agencies use?


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What are bond ratings?

Bond ratings are an essential tool when considering fixed-income investments. Ratings provide a professional assessment of credit risk, or the risk of default, which can be measured to some degree by analyzing the bond issuer's financial condition and creditworthiness.

Credit rating agencies perform this type of analysis and issue ratings that reflect the agency's assessment of the bond issuer's ability to meet the promised interest payments and return the principal upon maturity. The best-known independent rating agencies — Standard & Poor's, Moody's Investors Service, and Fitch Ratings — use similar scales in descending alphabetical order, ranging from AAA/Aaa for the most creditworthy bonds to C/D for the least creditworthy.

Bonds rated BBB/Baa or higher are considered "investment grade." Lower-rated bonds, commonly called "junk bonds," are non-investment grade; they generally offer higher yields and are considered speculative with higher credit risks. Bond insurance can add a layer of protection, but it is only as good as the insurer's credit quality and ability to pay.

A credit rating is not a recommendation to purchase a bond. Even so, higher-rated bonds in general may be more appealing to investors, and — due to supply and demand — typically have a lower yield than similar bonds with a lower rating. Investors must balance risk and reward when choosing bonds that present a comfortable risk while providing a yield that is appropriate to help meet investment goals.

Ratings are very important to a bond issuer when the bond is first offered for sale, because a higher rating may reduce interest costs. After the initial sale, significant shifts in the issuer's financial condition could result in rating changes that may affect the bond's yield and market value. However, as long as the issuer does not default, a change in a bond's rating would not affect the coupon rate or the principal due upon maturity.

Bonds carry other risks as well, such as market risk, interest rate risk, and inflation risk. However, these depend on factors that are difficult to measure or predict.

The principal value of bonds fluctuates with changes in market conditions. A bond sold prior to maturity may be worth more or less than its original value.

 
©2017 Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
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 IRS CIRCULAR 230 NOTICE: Pursuant to recently enacted U.S. Treasury Department Regulations, we are now required advise you that, unless otherwise expressly indicated, any federal tax advice expressed above was neither written nor intended by the sender or this firm to be used and cannot be used by any taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed under U.S. tax law. If any person uses or refers to any such tax advice in promoting, marketing or recommending a partnership or other entity, investment plan or arrangement to any taxpayer, then the advice should be considered to have been written to support the promotion or marketing by a person other than the sender or this firm of that transaction or matter, and such taxpayer should seek advice based on the taxpayer's particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor.

These materials are provided for general information and educational purposes based upon publicly available information from sources believed to be reliable—we cannot assure the accuracy or completeness of these materials. The information in these materials may change at any time and without notice.

Copyright © 2016 Michael David Schulman. All rights reserved.
 


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