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The newsletter articles on this page provide valuable information on timely and interesting financial issues across a variety of subject areas, including retirement, investments, personal finance, annuities, insurance, taxes, college, and government benefits.


Don't Let Rising Interest Rates Catch You by Surprise
Future of the Federal Estate Tax
The Health-Wealth Connection
What is a rollover IRA, and do I need one?
Can I roll my traditional 401(k) account balance over to a Roth IRA?


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Can I roll my traditional 401(k) account balance over to a Roth IRA?

Yes, you can make a direct or 60-day rollover from a 401(k) plan [or other qualified plan, 403(b) plan, or governmental 457(b) plan] to a Roth IRA, as long as you meet certain requirements.*

First, you must be entitled to a distribution from your plan. While you can always access your account when you terminate employment, in some cases you may be able to withdraw your own or your employer's contributions while you're still working (for example, at age 59½).

[Note: Your plan may also permit the "in plan" conversion of all or part of your account balance to a Roth account, regardless of whether you're eligible for a distribution from the plan. Check with your plan administrator.]

Second, your distribution must be an "eligible rollover distribution." Distributions that cannot be rolled over include hardship withdrawals, certain periodic payments, and required minimum distributions (RMDs).

Third, you must include the taxable portion of the distribution in your gross income in the year you make the rollover ("conversion"). But that's the price you have to pay to potentially receive tax-free qualified distributions from your Roth IRA in the future.

Fourth, if your distribution includes both after-tax and pre-tax dollars, you can generally direct that only the after-tax dollars be rolled over to the Roth IRA (resulting in a tax-free conversion), while making a tax-deferred rollover of the pre-tax dollars to a traditional IRA.

When evaluating whether to initiate a rollover from an employer plan to an IRA, be sure to: (1) ask about possible surrender charges that your employer plan or IRA may impose, (2) compare investment fees and expenses charged by your IRA with those charged by your employer plan (if any), and (3) understand any accumulated rights or guarantees that you may be giving up by transferring funds out of your employer plan. Also consider all of your distribution options, including leaving the money in your employer's plan, transferring the funds to a new employer's plan, or taking a cash withdrawal.

*If you make a 60-day rollover, your plan will withhold 20% of the taxable portion of your distribution for federal income tax purposes.

 
©2017 Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
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 IRS CIRCULAR 230 NOTICE: Pursuant to recently enacted U.S. Treasury Department Regulations, we are now required advise you that, unless otherwise expressly indicated, any federal tax advice expressed above was neither written nor intended by the sender or this firm to be used and cannot be used by any taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed under U.S. tax law. If any person uses or refers to any such tax advice in promoting, marketing or recommending a partnership or other entity, investment plan or arrangement to any taxpayer, then the advice should be considered to have been written to support the promotion or marketing by a person other than the sender or this firm of that transaction or matter, and such taxpayer should seek advice based on the taxpayer's particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor.

These materials are provided for general information and educational purposes based upon publicly available information from sources believed to be reliable—we cannot assure the accuracy or completeness of these materials. The information in these materials may change at any time and without notice.

Copyright © 2016 Michael David Schulman. All rights reserved.
 


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